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Cancer Epidemiology Research Program

The Cancer Epidemiology Research Program aims to improve our understanding of the genetic and environmental origins of cancer and to identify biomarkers for cancer risk and progression. This understanding informs the design of effective cancer prevention and control programs.

RESEARCH THEMES

Investigators in the Cancer Epidemiology Research Program concentrate on four main themes: 

Identifying genetic factors linked to cancer susceptibility

Evaluating the impact of dietary, lifestyle, and environmental factors on cancer risk

Identifying genetic and lifestyle factors that predict cancer survival and recurrence

Understanding the differences in cancer risk and mortality in different populations

Meet the Program Members

The Cancer Epidemiology Research Program is co-led by Xiao Ou Shu, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., and Wei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.  The co-leaders serve as liaisons to the director and senior leadership for the fostering of inter-programmatic collaboration and integration of cancer epidemiology into the clinical and basic research activities of the cancer center, including the provision of epidemiologic resources and access to large patient populations for whom the translation of scientific discoveries into practice is important.


Featured Publications

Program News

August 31, 2019

Cancer susceptibility genes

Gene variants associated with cancer risk appear to contribute to carcinogenesis by regulating target genes that in turn promote the generation of mutations.
August 9, 2019

Shu, Zheng receive Vietnam’s top honor for foreign scientists

The Vietnamese Ministry of Health has awarded two Vanderbilt epidemiologists the Memorabilia Medal “For the People’s Health” in appreciation for their contributions in helping the nation establish a population-based research program for cancer, diabetes and other non-communicable diseases.
June 29, 2019

Biomarkers of DNA methylation can be a predictor of breast cancer risk

Biomarkers of DNA methylation, which regulate gene expression, can be a predictor of breast cancer risk, according to a study published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute.